He's In The Details


The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis

This book is presented as a catalogue of letters from an experienced demon, Screwtape, to his inexperienced newbie-demon nephew, Wormwood. Screwtape offers sagely (devilishly sagely) advice to Wormwood and seeks to help him earn his keep in the underworld by properly tempting those oh-so-corruptible humans.

I need to mention that Wormwood is pretty inept. Sometimes he has the reverse effect of his intent. I don't need to mention that Screwtape is usually exasperated each time he opens a new letter. I tried to portray some exasperation in the sketch.

C.S. Lewis always takes a wonderfully thoughtful approach to religion and morality. Through the two demon's correspondence, one can see how to actually avoid unwanted temptations, and enjoy some laughs in the process. Good stuff!

This sketch was done with inkwash and a tiny, tiny bit of Micron pen. Then I just digitally converted it to a nice red hue. Hope you like it!

8 comments:

MamaLern said...

neato!

lucky said...

This popped up on my screen and I said... "ooooh!"

Great job!

Denise

Burt said...

Thanks, L & D!

:D

Muse said...

Ohh.. C.S. Lewis is one of the best.. Problem of Pain is my favorite, but Screwtape Letters is a great read as well.

Very cool representation of Screwtape. I especially like the red hue.

Burt said...

Muse - I just checked the CS Lewis section of my "waiting to be read" library and I do have Problem of Pain. I'll try to make that the next Lewis book I read. Thanks!

Caitlin said...

Love this! The reddish tone makes it more striking.

Blake said...

nice burt :) Yea I've yet to read this one. I've been told it's one of his best from the signature series. I've read Mere Christianity and Am reading The Great Divorce. Great stuff :)

Aimee said...

Good stuff! I like this one (especially since I've actually read this book).....
I remember reading somewhere that C.S. Lewis said he had a difficult time writing the book... thinking "like a demon" in order to get the ideas and perspectives bothered him.